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Support on Social Media

For over 10 years, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline has worked with  social media platforms and digital communities to establish recommended best practices in suicide prevention for social and digital media.

Safety Processes on Social Media

If you are worried about someone on social media, you can contact safety teams, who will reach out to connect the user with the help they need. *Note: Tumblr no longer directly responds to reports of suicide or self-harm.

Facebook

Facebook

The Lifeline has worked with Facebook to develop their supportive community tools, which include resources, messages for you to use, and directly contacting Facebook.

Twitter

Twitter

Click below to report messages about suicide or self-harm to Twitter. Twitter will send the user a direct message with the Lifeline number.

Instagram

Instagram

To report posts about suicide or self-harm on Instagram: Tap “…” below the post, Tap Report Inappropriate, Select This Photo Puts People At Risk > Self-Harm.

Snapchat

Snapchat

To report a safety concern, press and hold on that Snapchatter's name and tap the gear button. Then, tap 'Report' and reach out to Snapchat, and follow the prompts.

YouTube

YouTube

To report suicide or self-harm, click “More.” Highlight and click “Report” in the drop-down menu. Click “Harmful dangerous acts,” then “Suicide or self-injury.” YouTube will review the video and may send a message to the uploader with the Lifeline number.

Periscope

Periscope

If you come across sensitive content on the Periscope app, report the broadcast directly through there. When watching a broadcast on iOS or Android, select the three dot symbol next to the comment field (Say something...) and tap the 'Report Broadcast' button. Once you have selected this, you will be prompted to select a reason for the report. The reasons you can select are ‘Self-Harm,’ ‘Violence,’ ‘Sexual Content,’ and ‘Child Safety.’ Learn how to report content on the site and comments by clicking the link below.

Download the Social Media Toolkit

For digital community managers and organizations

How to Engage on Social Media

The “Support for Suicidal Individuals on Social and Digital Media” free toolkit was developed by the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to help digital community managers and social media platforms establish safety policies for helping individuals in suicidal crisis. While we recommend downloading the full kit, we have shared some excerpts below.

One of the first hurdles to cross in establishing a process for suicidal community members is one of identification. How do you know if someone may be in suicidal crisis? Examples of a community post from someone who may be at-risk:

  • “Hi, I really need some help, can someone please contact me.”
  • “My daughter has bromyalgia and the treatment alone costs too much for us to keep up with everything else. It’s become a full-time job to take care of her and I don’t know how I can keep going on like this. I feel hopeless with all of this and don’t know how I can keep going.”
  • “My 15-year-old son has been texting one of his friends and he has been having what appears to be thoughts of suicide. What should I do?”
  • “I’ve been really depressed lately and I don’t know how to x this. I have been thinking about suicide lately, my grandfather committed suicide 10 years ago. I’m so scared about all of this.”

If you have identified an individual that is at risk of suicide or in suicidal crisis but doesn’t seem to be at imminent risk, research suggests that the community moderator reach out to that individual directly, through a set of clear processes established by and best suited to the needs of your platform or community.

While we encourage active moderation and response online, we do not encourage community managers to take on the role of mental health care professionals. All engagement with an at-risk individual should be designed to provide appropriate support while connecting that individual to mental health or crisis resources like the Lifeline, your local crisis center, or other local mental health providers.

If, while engaging with an at-risk individual, you believe that the person may actually be at imminent risk of suicide, call 911 or other local emergency services for immediate assistance. Local emergency services are the fastest way to help a person who is at imminent risk. Other resources or protocols may be inappropriate during this situation and should not be applied.

If your organization is interested in a more hands-on approach to crafting suicide prevention protocols, use our Contact Us form below.

Get in touch

Call the Lifeline

Call the Lifeline Anytime, 24/7

1-800-273-8255

Contact Us

Do not use this contact form if you need crisis counseling. If you need immediate help, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) to talk with a trained counselor.

Contact Us