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The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, across the United States. The Lifeline is comprised of a national network of over 160 local crisis centers, combining custom local care and resources with national standards and best practices.

Lifeline History

The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Mental Health Association of New York City (MHA-NYC) launched the Lifeline on January 1, 2005. MHA-NYC, the administrator of the grant, works with its partners, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), National Council for Behavioral Health, and others, to manage the project, along with Living Works, Inc., an internationally respected organization specializing in suicide intervention skills training.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is independently evaluated by a federally-funded investigation team from Columbia University’s Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene. The Lifeline receives ongoing consultation and guidance from national suicide prevention experts, consumer advocates, and other stakeholders through the Lifeline’s Steering Committee, Consumer/Survivor Committee, and Standards, Training and Practices Committee.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a leader in suicide prevention and mental health crisis care. Since its inception, the Lifeline has engaged in a variety of initiatives to improve crisis services and advance suicide prevention for all, including innovative public messaging, best practices in mental health, and cutting-edge partnerships.

The Mental Health Association of New York City

The Mental Health Association of New York City (MHA-NYC) is a not-for-profit organization that addresses mental health needs in New York City and across the nation.

Through a three-part mission of service, advocacy and education, MHA-NYC works to identify unmet needs and develop culturally sensitive programs to improve the lives of individuals and families impacted by mental illness while promoting the importance of mental health. Based in New York City, MHA-NYC has administered crisis hotlines and programs providing services to New York City and the entire United States, including: The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, the national Disaster Distress Helpline, the Veterans Crisis Line, and NYC Well.

Lifeline Committees

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline utilizes the guidance of experts, as well as the voices of lived experience, to continually improve Lifeline services. These individuals bring invaluable knowledge and support to our mission of reducing the national incidence of suicide.

Steering

Steering

The role of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Steering Committee is to provide the network's primary investigators/administrators with expert guidance on the issues that affect the SAMHSA-funded National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network, its administration, the crisis center community, and its consumers.

David Covington, LPC, MBA (Chair)

David Covington, LPC, MBA serves as CEO and President of RI International, is an owner of Behavioral Health Link and leads the international initiatives “Crisis Now” and “Zero Suicide.” He is a two-time national winner of the Council of State Governments Innovations Award, in 2008 with the Georgia Crisis & Access Line and again in 2012 with Magellan Health. For five consecutive years, he competed as a national finalist in innovations award competitions, including Harvard University’s Innovations in American Government in 2009, and was featured in Business Week magazine.

He is an acclaimed global speaker, with top-ranked TED-style Talks and conference keynotes. In 2015, readers of his healthcare innovation blog represented 90 different countries. Previously he served as Vice-President at Magellan Health responsible for the administrative, clinical, financial and programmatic operations of the $750 million per year integrated health plan contract with Arizona Medicaid and the Department of Health Services.

Mr. Covington has served as a member of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention since it was created in 2010, co-chairing task forces on clinical care and crisis services. He has served as vice-chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline SAMHSA steering committee since it was created in 2005. He has served as the clinical division chair of the American Association of Suicidology since 2014. He served on the National Council for Behavioral Health board of directors from 2011 to 2014 and the Relias Learning Behavioral Health Advisory Board from 2014 to 2016.

Mr. Covington’s behavioral healthcare management history also includes CEO of Behavioral Health Link and Director of Public Sector Quality Management at APS Healthcare. He is a licensed professional counselor and has an MBA from Kennesaw State and a Master’s of Science from the University of Memphis.

Michael F. Hogan, Ph.D. (Vice-Chair) 

Dr. Michael Hogan served as New York State Commissioner of Mental Health from 2007-2012, and now operates a consulting practice in health and behavioral health care. The NYS Office of Mental Health operated 23 accredited psychiatric hospitals, and oversaw New York’s $5B public mental health system serving 650,000 individuals annually. Previously Dr. Hogan served as Director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health (1991-2007) and Commissioner of the Connecticut DMH from 1987-1991. He chaired the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health in 2002-2003. He served as the first behavioral health representative on the board of The Joint Commission (2007-2015) and chaired its Standards and Survey Procedures Committee. He has served as a member of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention since it was created in 2010, co-chairing task forces on clinical care and interventions and crisis care. He is a member of the NIMH National Mental Health Advisory Council. Previously, he served on the NIMH Council (1994-1998), as President of the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (2003-2005) and as Board President of NASMHPD’s Research Institute (1989-2000). His awards for national leadership include recognition by the National Governor’s Association, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the Campaign for Mental Health Reform, the American College of Mental Health Administration and the American Psychiatric Association. He is a graduate of Cornell University, and earned a MS degree from the State University College in Brockport NY, and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University.

Bart Andrews, Ph.D.

Bart Andrews, PhD, is Vice President of Clinical Practice/Evaluation at Behavioral Health Response. He started at BHR as a crisis intervention clinician in 1998. Dr. Andrews has dedicated the last 18 years of this life to suicide and crisis intervention. Dr. Andrews is a person in recovery and a suicide attempt survivor. He believes that the path to suicide prevention must be framed in the context of relationships, community and culture. Suicide is a community health problem, and everyone can help. Dr. Andrews was recently recognized as one of the top 21 mental health professionals to follow on Twitter.

He has over 20 years of experience providing behavioral health services. Bart received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University. He is actively involved in raising community awareness about the risk of suicide and training community members, law enforcement and other professionals in suicide assessment and intervention. He participates on several crisis and suicide related boards: serves as President of the National Association of Crisis Director and Co-Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Standards, Training and Practices Sub-Committee. Dr. Andrews is also an Applied Suicide Intervention Skills (ASIST) Senior Training Coach. Through BHR, He created the first suicide follow-up program in the State of Missouri, and BHR has expanded suicide follow-up care to youth and adults throughout the eastern region of Missouri. He is the Co-Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Standards, Training and Practices Committee.

Jennifer Battle, LMSW

Jennifer Battle is the Director of the HelpLine at The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD Services in Houston, Texas. The Harris Center HelpLine serves as the main contact center for The Harris Center which is the largest provider of behavioral health services in the State of Texas, and as the crisis line for 39 Texas counties. The Harris Center HelpLine partners with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to provide coverage for previously under-served Texas area codes. Jennifer is a Mental Health First Aid, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, ASK about Suicide to Save a Life, and SafeTalk Trainer and supervises the Community Training Department for The Harris Center. In collaboration with the Houston Police Department and Houston Emergency Communications Center, she works to provide a Crisis Call Diversion Program to route people attempting to access mental health services via law enforcement to a more appropriate level of care through local behavioral health options.

In addition to her work at The Harris Center, Ms. Battle serves as the Vice-President of the Board for the National Association of Crisis Organization Directors (NASCOD) and is the past Co-Chair and current member of the Texas Suicide Prevention Council. She is currently part of the Zero Suicide Texas (ZEST) Learning Collaborative, the Trauma Informed Practice Implementation Team for The Harris Center, and serves at the Suicide Prevention Officer for The Harris Center.

Ms. Battle is a proud Social Worker and teaches as adjunct faculty at her alma mater the University Of Houston Graduate College Of Social Work. She also enjoys teaching Bachelor level social work classes at the University of Houston – Clear Lake and University of Houston – Downtown. She served as a member of the Lifeline Standards, Training, and Practice Committee for seven years.

Kita S. Curry, Ph.D.

Psychologist Dr. Kita S. Curry has been President and CEO of Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services for almost 20 years. Founded in 1942, Didi Hirsch is dedicated to serving communities where stigma or poverty limits access. From 11 locations and 100 schools, it provides transformative mental health and substance use care to children and adults in Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

The first in the nation, its Suicide Prevention Center has been recognized nationally and internationally. Last year, its innovative attempt survivors’ support group model was accepted for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s (SPRC) Best Practice Registry; since then, there have been over 400 requests for the curriculum. A National Suicide Prevention Lifeline member since its inception, Didi Hirsch answered more than 70,000 calls/chats last year. One of three members with Spanish-speaking counselors 24/7, it also is one of three selected for the national Disaster Distress Helpline.

Dr. Curry has testified before the California legislature and served on California’s Advisory Committees on Suicide Prevention and on Stigma and Discrimination. Past board president of the California Council of Community Behavioral Health Agencies, which co-sponsored a ballot initiative that created a tax to support mental health, she now serves on the board of the National Council on Behavioral Healthcare. To help erase stigma, Dr. Curry has shared her family history of mood disorders and her own struggles with suicidal depression widely in media interviews. Suicide has taken the lives of three relatives.

A Phi Beta Kappa English major from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Curry earned her doctorate in psychology at UCLA, supported by a National Institute of Mental Health Training Grant. Also an award-winning poet, her poetry collection, What Snakes Want (Mayapple Press), was released under the name Kita Shantiris in 2015.

Miriam Delphin-Rittmon, PhD.

Miriam Delphin-Rittmon, PhD., is the Commissioner of theConnecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services(DMHAS). Prior to her appointment she held varied roles at the Department including Deputy Commissioner, Senior Policy Advisor and Director of the Office of Multicultural Healthcare Equality. Under the Obama Administration, Dr. Delphin-Rittmon served as Senior Advisor at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) with the Department of Health and Human Services working on a range of policy initiatives addressing behavioral health equity, workforce development, and healthcare reform. Dr. Delphin-Rittmon has also held positions as Assistant Professor and Director of Health Equity and Multicultural Research and Consultation with the Program for Recovery and Community Health in the Yale Department of Psychiatry.

Mary Drexler, MSW

Mary Drexler is currently the part-time Executive Director forCONTACT USA. She has served in this position for the past 5 years.  She has an extensive background in crisis intervention and suicide prevention. She worked eleven years as an Information/Referral and Crisis Center Director in Connecticut that served residents statewide. She has been in the social services field since 1979. She served three years as Crisis Division Chair on the Council of Delegates for the American Association of Suicidology. Mary is also an ASIST trainer. She has also established Drexler Consulting, LLC as an entity for providing training to organizations and community groups, in areas such as suicide prevention and intervention, effective listening, stress management, and more.

Mary also serves as the full-time Executive Director of the CT Council on Problem Gambling. She serves on the National Council on Problem Gambling’s Board of Directors. She hopes to pursue further research in the area of problem gambling and suicide in the future. She holds a Masters of Social Work from the University Of Connecticut School Of Social Work.

Pamela End of Horn

Pamela End of Horn comes to the Division of Behavioral Health for the U.S. Indian Health Services from the Department of Veterans Affairs, working in suicide prevention and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Pam was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation of South Dakota. She is an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Sioux Tribe. Pamela has a Master’s Degree in Social Work with practicums in Domestic Violence. In addition, she is certified in Cognitive Processing Therapy. She currently holds advanced practice licenses in North Dakota and Minnesota as a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker.

Robert Gebbia

Robert Gebbia serves as the CEO of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which has become the leading suicide prevention nonprofit organization in the United States. In 16 years, Gebbia has developed a nationwide network of 75 chapters and increased AFSP’s annual revenue from $700,000 to over $16 million in support of the mission. In the last five years alone, AFSP has initiated and funded one out of every five studies on suicide – making AFSP the largest private funder of suicide research in the United States. In 2014, Gebbia announced AFSP’s bold goal to reduce the annual suicide rate 20 percent by 2025.

Mr. Gebbia helped launch the Out of the Darkness Walks to raise awareness and funds for suicide prevention. The walks – now held in almost 400 locations across the country – have given millions of people a way to raise awareness and take action against this leading cause of death. In 2009, Gebbia led the effort to bring AFSP and the Suicide Prevention Action Network USA together to strengthen grassroots advocacy. The merger has helped advocates secure funding for mental health and suicide prevention programs at both the state and federal levels.

Mr. Gebbia is a founding member of the National Council for Suicide Prevention, serves on the National Lifeline Advisory Committee, the Executive Committee of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and the Board of Directors of the National Health Council.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Hofstra University and a master’s degree in Sociology from the New School for Social Research. He completed the Harvard Business School’s Human Services Management Executive Program and IBM’s Leadership Commitment Program for nonprofit executives.

Madelyn Gould, PhD, MPH

Madelyn Gould, PhD, MPH, is a Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry at the Columbia University Medical Center, and a Research Scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. During the past three decades, she has obtained extensive experience in the area of suicide prevention, conducting numerous federally funded grants from the National Institute of Health (NIMH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and publishing several seminal articles on youth suicide risk and preventive interventions.  Her current SAMHSA-funded projects focus on the evaluation of telephone crisis follow-up services, continuity of care enhancements in EDs, chat crisis services, and telephone crisis interventions with callers at imminent suicide risk.  She is also studying youth suicide screening programs, and suicide risks related to bullying, contagion and modeling, and the effect of a peer’s suicide on fellow students.

Dr. Gould has a strong commitment to applying her research to program and policy development. She has participated in a number of U.S. government commissions on suicide prevention and has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Shneidman Award for Research from the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) in 1991, the New York State Office of Mental Health Research (NYSOMH) Award in 2002, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) Research Award in 2006, the New York State Suicide Prevention Center’s Excellence in Suicide Prevention Award in 2011, and the 2013 Dublin Award from the American Association of Suicidology (AAS), which is a lifetime achievement award for outstanding contributions to the field of suicide prevention.

Brian Hepburn, M.D.

Prior to becoming NASMHPD’s Executive Director in July 2015, Dr. Hepburn served 13 years as Maryland’s Mental Health Program Director. In his role as Maryland SMHA Director he participated and led many NASMHPD activities and projects as an active member of the NASMHPD Medical Directors Council. He has been a practicing psychiatrist for more than three decades. He works closely with the National Association of Medicaid Directors on key issues related to behavioral health services under the ACA and Health Integration. Dr. Hepburn received his M.D. degree in 1979 from the University of Michigan School of Medicine and received Residency Training in Psychiatry at the University of Maryland from 1979 to 1983. He was a Full-Time Faculty Member at the University of Maryland from 1983 to 1988 and has been on the Volunteer faculty at the University of Maryland since 1988. He maintained a private practice from 1983 until 2004.

Dwight Holton

Dwight Holton is Oregon’s former U.S. Attorney and current Chief Executive Officer of Lines for Life, the leading suicide and substance abuse prevention nonprofit in the Northwest. Lines for Life helps over 50,000 families a year with its crisis line services, including the Suicide Lifeline and the innovative YouthLine and Military Helpline. As a part of the Veterans Crisis Line network, Lines for Life helped nearly 25,000 vets and family members in 2015 alone. Lines for Life also promotes healthy kids and communities through drug and alcohol awareness, youth and parent drug prevention education programs, advocacy and public policy.

Mr. Holton took the reins at Lines for Life after 15 years as a federal prosecutor, most recently as Oregon United States Attorney. Through his work as a prosecutor, Mr. Holton learned the importance of early intervention and prevention strategies – and as U.S. Attorney, he launched efforts to improve access to addiction treatment and better mental health services. Mr. Holton was selected as first-ever recipient of OHSU Pain Awareness and Investigation Network (PAIN) Award for his efforts to address the prescription drug overdose epidemic in Oregon.

At Lines for Life, Mr. Holton is leading the organization to expanded work in prevention of suicide and substance abuse. Lines for Life is launching an innovative school climate initiative designed to implement a comprehensive approach to improving school climate and student mental health, academic performance, attendance and more equitable discipline practices.  Lines for Life is also working to build youth suicide prevention efforts in regions throughout Oregon.

David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP

David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of Clinical Training at The Catholic University of America; he is an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He has published five books and numerous peer-reviewed journal articles.  Dr. Jobes is a past President of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) and he is the recipient of various awards for his scientific  work including the 1995 AAS “Shneidman Award” (early career contribution to suicidology), the 2012 AAS “Dublin Award” (for career contributions in suicidology), and the 2016 AAS “Linehan Award” (for suicide treatment research).  He has been a consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the FBI, the Department of Defense, and Veterans Affairs.   Dr. Jobes is member of the Scientific Council and the Public Policy Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).  He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and is Board certified in clinical psychology (American Board of Professional Psychology).  Dr. Jobes maintains a private clinical and forensic practice at the Washington Psychological Center. He is the Co-Chair of the Natioal Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Standards, Training and Practices Committee.

DeQuincy Lezine, Ph.D.

Dr. Lezine attempted suicide during college, but turned his personal despair into advocacy by forming the first student-led college mental health and suicide prevention group (Brown University chapter of the Suicide Prevention Action Network; B-SPAN). Since 1996, Dr. Lezine has worked with many organizations to promote suicide prevention including Suicide Prevention Action Network (SPAN) USA; National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI); the Organization of Attempters and Survivors in Interfaith Services (OASSIS); La Frontera / EMPACT Suicide Prevention Center; National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance; Suicide Attempt Survivor Task Force and Impact Group); Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC); Oklahoma Suicide Prevention Council; the Center for Dignity, Recovery, and Empowerment; and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. He was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2015 Voice Awards by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

After graduating from UCLA with a Ph.D. in clinical psychology Dr. Lezine completed a postdoctoral research fellowship with an emphasis on public health approaches to suicide prevention at the University of Rochester Center for the Prevention and Study of Suicide. He is the Chair of the Attempt Survivor and Lived Experience Division of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) as well as an internationally recognized scholar, advocate, and public speaker. As a professional writer, he is the author of “Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide,” released in 2008 by Oxford University Press and primary writer of “The Way Forward: Pathways to hope, recovery, and wellness with insights from lived experience” released in 2014 by the Action Alliance (Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force). Dr. Lezine is President and CEO of Prevention Communities, an applied research organization with a focus on suicide prevention and mental health promotion. He is the Co-Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Consumer Survivor Committee.

Laura Mayer 

Laura Mayer is the Program Director at PRS CrisisLink, a 24-hour crisis hotline, text line and telephone reassurance program serving northern Virginia and the District of Columbia.  PRS CrisisLink is a program of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services, Inc. and exists so that individuals living with mental illness, substance use disorders, mild intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and anyone who faces life crises can achieve safety, personal wellness, recovery and community integration. As the Program Director, Ms. Mayer has been instrumental bringing cost effective and evidence-based suicide prevention programming to the local community. In 2014, Ms. Mayer partnered with the local public mental health system to provide crisis texting to the Fairfax County Public School System and the surrounding communities. Ms. Mayer has been building partnerships with the sexual violence and domestic violence communities to bring a trauma-informed approach to crisis care and suicide prevention.  She hopes to expand these relationships to bring improved coordinated care between emergency departments, public emergency mental health and the sexual and domestic violence serving agencies.

Ms. Mayer is a member of the Suicide Prevention Alliance of Northern Virginia, the Youth Suicide Fatality Review Team and mental health promotion workgroups in several jurisdictions. She has been interviewed and featured by Comcast Newsmakers and NBC4’s Changing Minds Campaign. She is currently working towards her degree in Social Work and Community Health at George Mason University.

Patricia Morris, M.Ed. MAC

Pat Morris has been Program Director of Care Crisis Response Services at Volunteers of America Western Washington since 2006. She is responsible for administration of an AAS and CONTACT USA  accredited 24 hour Regional Crisis and Triage line, a Regional Utilization Management program and a centralized intake and referral call center for mental health services and a Chat online emotional support program. The Crisis Line is a Lifeline affiliate, and Ms. Morris has been a member of the Lifeline Steering Committee since 2009. She serves on the NASCOD Board of Directors and recently served as AAS’s Crisis Centers Division Chair. She is a member of a Washington State Regional Integrated Crisis Response System and sits on numerous regional committees and task forces. She provides regional and statewide trainings on Suicide Prevention/Intervention; Substance Abuse, Co-occurring Disorders and related Mental Health topics. She is a certified ASIST and safeTALK training through Livingworks. She also provides regional Crisis Intervention training to law enforcement personnel. Prior to her work at Volunteers of America Western Washington, Ms. Morris was the Program Director for a Hospital-based Chemical Dependency Program in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, with special emphasis on Co-occurring Disorders and Addictive Family systems.

Ms. Morris is a licensed professional counselor, a nationally certified mental health and Master Addiction counselor with a Masters of Education Degree from the University of Idaho. During her thirty year career in the Mental Health and Chemical Dependency field, she has experience providing mental health case management, involuntary treatment evaluations, psychosocial and Clubhouse rehabilitation and outpatient therapy. She has worked in Mental Health emergency services and crisis lines in Washington, Idaho and Oregon. She has developed and administered inpatient and outpatient chemical dependency programs, specializing in co-occurring disorders. She has also served as an Adjunct professor in Northwest Universities teaching graduate level coursework, and is currently an instructor at Western Washington University.

Kenneth Norton, L.I.C.S.W.

Mr. Norton is the Executive Director of the New Hampshire chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI NH). Mr. Norton led the development of NAMI NH’s Connect Suicide Prevention Program which is designated as a National Best Practice Program in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. He has served on numerous local and national workgroups and committees related to suicide prevention efforts and has presented nationally and internationally. Mr. Norton participated in the planning for the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention and serves on several Action Alliance task forces.  He worked to legislatively establish the NH Suicide Prevention Council and the NH Suicide Fatality Review Committee. Mr. Norton has a great deal of experience dealing with mental illness from the family perspective and has also worked extensively in community mental health as well as on advocacy issues related to mental health care and suicide prevention.

Jerry Reed, Ph.D., MSW

Dr. Jerry Reed is the Director of the federally funded Suicide Prevention Resource Center(SPRC), where he and his staff provide state and local officials, grantees, policymakers, interested stakeholders, and the general public with assistance in developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and strategies to prevent suicide. Dr. Reed is also a Vice President of the Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) and serves as the Director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Injury, Violence and Suicide where he co-directs the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention (ICRC-S) with partners at the University Of Rochester Medical Center.

Dr. Reed served on the Board of the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) from September 2007 – September 2013 as Chair of the Council of Organizational Representatives and is a member of the Violence Prevention Alliance Steering Committee operated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and international partners. He is also an inaugural member of the Executive Committee of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (NAASP) where he co-chaired the Task Force responsible for revising the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP).

Prior to joining EDC as SPRC’s Director in 2008, Dr. Reed served for five years as Executive Director of the Suicide Prevention Action Network USA (SPAN USA), a national non-profit created to raise awareness, build political will, and call for action with regard to advancing, implementing and evaluating a national strategy to address suicide. Additionally, he served in the Office of Senator Harry Reid (NV) addressing health issues, served as a career civil servant with the Department of the Army for fifteen years as a Community Services Program Manager both in U.S. and Europe, and served  in the U.S. Navy before being honorably discharged in 1978.

Dan Reidenberg, Psy.D., FAPA, DAPA, FACFEI, CRS, BCPC, CMT

Dr. Dan Reidenberg is the Executive Director of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education(SAVE), the Managing Director of the National Council for Suicide Prevention and US Representative to the International Association for Suicide Prevention. He is a Diplomate, Fellow, Certified Master Therapist, Certified Relationship Specialist and is Chair of the Advisory Board of the American Psychotherapy Association, Chair of the Certified Relationship Specialists program, and serves on the Advisory Boards for Reachout.com and YRB Council in Canada.

Dr. Reidenberg began his career working on crisis lines at Crisis Connection in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he handled calls and spoke publicly for the agency on crisis management. He went on to work at the Bill Kelly House (one of the first dual programs for adults in the country), maintained a private practice and worked on in-patient psychiatry adolescent and adult units in St. Paul, Minnesota. At Family & Children’s Service he oversaw ten mental health and community programs that included crisis lines and intervention programs for youth and adults. He has extensive experience in psychotherapy, forensic work, consulting and training of both attorneys and healthcare professionals. Dr. Reidenberg speaks nationally and internationally on suicide prevention issues, assisted with groundbreaking research on billboards and media related to suicide prevention and serves on various national and state suicide prevention task forces and committees. Under his direction, SAVE operates a national multimedia campaign, professional and community education and training programs, as well as develops resources and support for those in crisis and survivors. He was responsible for the development of Linking Education and Awareness of Depression and Suicide (LEADS) an evidence-based best practices program curriculum in suicide prevention for use in high schools, as well as several other best practice materials. He also led the task force that created the Recommendations for Media Reporting on Suicide and the development of the Online Technology tool for social media.

Marlon R. Rollins, PhD, LMHC

Dr. Marlon Rollins is the Chief Operating Officer of Fremont Hospital, an affiliate of Universal Health Services, Inc. (UHS). At a 148 bed capacity, Dr. Rollins oversees clinical operations of the largest free-standing psychiatric hospital in the California Bay Area. The care continuum also includes a Partial Hospitalization Program and Intensive Outpatient Program for both adults and adolescents. He has over 12 years clinical experience in psychological services. He has dedicated his efforts to organizations and efforts aimed at suicide prevention and improving the health and well-being of diverse communities. Since 2013, UHS has been a national partner with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance), working to strengthen the country’s clinical capacity to provide innovative suicide prevention and care. UHS is proud to have been a champion in the creation of the Zero Suicide website, an interactive toolkit essential to supporting the work of organizations adopting and committing to a comprehensive approach to suicide care, as well as having its facilities serve as pilot sites for the Zero Suicide initiative.  Its commitment to suicide prevention also extends to the communities its facilities serve through the dissemination of evidence based suicide prevention resources used to educate community partners including schools, primary care physicians, emergency departments and first responders.

While working with a large integrated healthcare system in the state of Indiana, Dr. Rollins testified before legislators on expanding crisis services. He shares his knowledge and lived experience on various media platforms to fight stigma on mental illness including the loss of his sister to suicide who was a registered nurse. He is a member of the National Association for Crisis Organization Directors (NASCOD). Dr. Rollins is a member of the California Hospital Association. He is the recipient of the Human Achievement award from the Center of Leadership Development, Inc. and is trained in Lean Six Sigma. He has provided training to the Indiana School Counselors Association and school nurses on self-injury. He has published quantitative and qualitative research in the Journal for Gifted Studies and Roeper Review as well as a contributing author for the Handbook of Multicultural Counseling. For five years, he was the Coordinator of Counseling Services at a 300 capacity residential school for gifted students called the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics and Humanities and an instructor of AP Psychology. He was elected as the Outstanding Psychology Student of the year for his undergraduate class in 2001 as an honors student. He conferred his doctorate degree in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Counseling Psychology and Gifted Studies from Ball State University in 2010. Additionally, Dr. Rollins is an ordained minister from the Church of God In Christ, Inc. His research interests include advanced crisis systems, outcome assessment, suicide prevention, educational development, high ability studies, social justice and multicultural counseling.

Tanya A. Royster, M.D.

Dr. Tanya A. Royster is the Director for the DC Department of Behavioral Health, the single state authority for mental health and substance use disorders services. She is a Board certified general, child and adolescent psychiatrist. Dr. Royster previously served as the Director of Behavioral Health at the Franciscan Physicians Network in Illinois. As Chief of Clinical Services System with the Illinois Department of Human Services Division of Mental Health, she led the efforts to integrate mental health and primary care — proven to lead to the best outcomes. She also has served as medical consultant to an Illinois care coordination entity that provides care coordination services for the Illinois Medicaid agency.

Dr. Royster is a seasoned clinician, teacher, researcher and innovator. She earned tenure at the University of Illinois at Chicago where she published multiple articles and taught in the departments of medicine, nursing, social work and Honors College.

Dr. Royster has a proven track record and long-standing interest in creating and sustaining healthy communities, delivering culturally competent, high quality services, creating data driven, outcomes-based system transformation and reducing health care disparities. The Annie E. Casey Foundation selected her as one of its 2010-2011 Children and Family Fellows. The Fellowship is an intensive results-based executive leadership program that supports child and family-serving leaders across sectors in enhancing their efforts at leading major system reforms and community change initiatives that get results.

Dr. Royster is a graduate of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and completed her general psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry residencies at New York University/Bellevue Hospital Medical Center.

Linda Rosenberg, MSW

The National Council for Behavioral Health is our nation’s most effective advocate for behavioral health prevention, early intervention, science-based treatment, and recovery. Harnessing the voices of the 10 million adults, children, and families served by the National Council’s 2,700 member organizations, Linda Rosenberg’s leadership helped secure passage of the federal parity law, expanded integrated behavioral and primary care services, introduced Mental Health First Aid in the U.S., and built an array of organizational, clinical and workforce improvement initiatives. The National Council’s strong support of the Mental Health Excellence Act will result in the first comprehensive effort to establish community accountability for the health of people with serious mental illnesses and addictions, the consistent utilization of evidence-based practices, and the standardized measurement of outcomes.

John Santopietro, M.D., DFAPA

Dr. John Santopietro is Chief Clinical Officer of Behavioral Health atCarolinas HealthCare System, an 8.5 billion dollar not-for-profit healthcare delivery system headquartered in Charlotte, NC, with 60 thousand teammates providing 13 million patient encounters a year across three states. He has devoted his career to transforming systems in order to improve care and the experience of care for people suffering with mental illness. He has held leadership positions in public mental health, hospital systems, and the community and is nationally known for his work. He is passionate about the need for clinical leadership in solving the substantial challenges which confront our healthcare system and teaches on psychiatric leadership. In his current role he has driven transformation through such projects as the building of a state-of-the-art psychiatric hospital, integrating behavioral health into primary care and Emergency Rooms using ‘virtual’ teams and telemedicine, as well as training four thousand people in the Charlotte area in Mental Health First Aid. Dr. Santopietro graduated from Yale University, Northwestern University Medical School, and completed his internship, residency, and fellowship at Harvard Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and a board member of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists. He was president of the Connecticut Psychiatric Association where he earned the CPS Service Award for his leadership during the Sandy Hook tragedy. He has served as a gubernatorial appointee to the Connecticut Mental Health Commissioner’s advisory board and currently serves on two state-wide task forces in North Carolina – one called by the NC Institute of Medicine and one by Governor Pat McCrory. Dr. Santopietro grew up in Rhode Island where he spent summers at his grandfather’s fish market learning hard work and leadership. He most enjoys spending time with his wife, Kathy, and their three sons.

Sally Spencer-Thomas, Psy.D., MNM

As a clinical psychologist, mental health advocate, faculty member, and survivor of her brother’s suicide, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas sees the issues of suicide prevention from many perspectives. Currently, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is the CEO and Co-Founder of the Carson J Spencer Foundation, an award-winning organization dedicated to sustaining a passion for living through suicide prevention, social enterprise and support for people bereaved by suicide. Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is also the past Director of the Survivor of Suicide Loss Division with the American Association of Suicidology, and is the Co-Lead of the Workplace Task Force with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.

Within her role as CEO of the Carson J Spencer Foundation, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has established and founded Working Minds, the nation’s first comprehensive suicide prevention program exclusively dedicated to suicide prevention in the workplace; founded the FIRE Within program for youth and social entrepreneurs; and, was the principal partner on the award-winning Man Therapy social marketing campaign.

Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has received wide recognition for her work and has been an invited guest to the White House Briefing on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention in DC and to the World Health Organization’s World Suicide Report Launch in Geneva.  As a professional speaker, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas was the first national speaker to frame suicide prevention as a social justice issue and has presented at dozens of college campuses and regional/national conferences empowering students to join the suicide prevention and mental health promotion movements.

Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is also a published author and co-author of several books and articles addressing suicide prevention and postvention in the workplace, college suicide prevention, spirituality and mental health, men’s mental health, and suicide and first responders. Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has delivered countless conference workshops, webinars and major seminars on these topics and has been invited to make plenary addresses internationally in the United States, Canada, Ireland, Estonia, Australia, Norway, Uruguay, China and Italy. She is the Co-Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Consumer Survivor Committee.

Becky Stoll, LCSW 

Becky Stoll, Centerstone’s Vice President of Crisis and Disaster Management, is a recognized leader in the areas of crisis services and suicide prevention. Becky is responsible for the operation of Centerstone Tennessee’s Crisis Call Center and Mobile Crisis Outreach Teams and the Clinical Pathway for Suicide Prevention for all Centerstone states (Florida, Illinois, Indiana, and Tennessee). She is a member of the National Action Alliance’s “Zero Suicides in Health and Behavioral Healthcare” Advisory Group as well as serving as a faculty member for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center at Zero Suicide Academies across the country. Becky has participated in the international movement around Zero Suicides in Health and Behavioral Health Care by attending the first meeting of suicide prevention leaders in Oxford, UK and the most recent meeting in Atlanta, GA. She also has extensive training and experience in crisis and disaster management for human-made and natural disasters. Becky is a Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress and a Diplomate of the American Association of Experts in Traumatic Stress. She is a Certified Employee Assistance Professional. Ms. Stoll has provided training, consultation, and post-event response nationally and internationally to aviation, banking, educational institutions, emergency response organizations, and professional sports.

Caitlin Thompson, Ph.D.

Dr. Caitlin Thompson is the Department of Veterans Affairs’National Mental Health Director of Suicide Prevention and Community Engagement. She is responsible for policy development, provider and patient education in the areas of suicide awareness and prevention, implementing assessment and treatment strategies and the dissemination of new findings in the area of suicide throughout the VA system and broader community. Prior to this role, Dr. Thompson spent five years as the Clinical Care Coordinator for the National Veterans/Military Crisis Line. A licensed clinical psychologist by training, she also serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University Of Rochester Department Of Psychiatry. In 2012, she spent five months detailed as the VA Liaison for the DOD’s Defense Suicide Prevention Office. Dr. Thompson completed her Bachelor’s degree in music at Brown University and her Master’s degree and Doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Virginia.

Debi Traeder 

Debi Traeder is the Community Behavioral Health Liaison, serving the suicide and substance abuse prevention needs of Central Wisconsin through North Central Health Care, Wausau, Wisconsin. Utilizing her extensive background in marketing and public speaking to provide training, technical assistance and consultation she collaborates with local, state and national resources, to assist community partners in identifying needs and gaps in services so to develop and implement strategies to bridge those needs. Prior to North Central Health Care, Debi was the suicide prevention coordinator for Mental Health America-Wisconsin, helping found and coordinating programming for the statewide initiative, Prevent Suicide Wisconsin. Debi also spent eight years as an educator and outreach coordinator liaison with Aspirus Behavioral Health Services in Wausau. In these positions, she continues to provide trainings on mental health topics to agencies across Wisconsin. She has also exercised her passion for prevention as a chair of Prevent Suicide Marathon County and member of the AOD Partnership. Ms. Traeder is a Master Trainer in QPR, Question, Persuade, Refer – a national suicide prevention program; able to train others to present the program. She also is a certified QPR-T instructor, a specialized risk assessment and management training for mental health professionals. She also serves on WISE – Wisconsin Initiative for Stigma Elimination. She is also a certified Mental Health First Aid Instructor as well as a trainer in Trauma-Informed Care and bullying prevention. Ms. Traeder serves on the National Zero Suicide Initiative and prior to being elected to the Lifeline Steering Committee, served on its Standards, Training and Practices Subcommittee, as well as various subcommittees with the American Association of Suicidology and American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She also serves on the Wisconsin Crisis Network and the Mental Health Substance Use Recovery Training and sits on both planning committees. She is also an accomplished public speaker, presenting on topics in mental health, alcohol and other drug abuse, life skills and overall wellbeing.

Ms. Traeder also serves her local community as a United Way action team member and as a member of Rotary International, having served as past president of the Rotary Club of Wausau and currently as the district training chair. She also serves on the board of the Salvation Army and Healthy Marathon County, the Rural Health Initiative, and other community projects.

Eduardo Vega, M.A.

Eduardo Vega is the Executive Director for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco(MHA-SF). In this role he serves as Director and Principal Investigator Center for Dignity, Recovery and Stigma Elimination, the nation’s first consumer-run technical assistance, research and training center (TARTC) focused on best practices for recovery, social change and stigma reduction including stigma around suicide.

Mr. Vega has served on the Lifeline Steering Committee since 2005. In 2009 he was appointed to the Executive Committee of the National Action Alliance on Suicide Prevention, a joint public-private project of the Departments of Health and Human Services and Defense, in 2010 through which he chairs the Task Force on Suicide-Attempt Survivors and helped develop the revised National Strategy on Suicide Prevention. He was founding chair of the Lifeline’s Consumer-Survivor Subcommittee. Mr. Vega served as California Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC) in May 2007 until 2012 and was the first Chief of the Office of Empowerment and Advocacy for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. Previously, as program manager with the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse and dissemination Director of the UPenn Collaborative on Community Integration, he developed content and resources for related programs nationally.

As a thought leader in recovery and system transformation and previous community provider, Mr. Vega has worked to advance mental health systems and policies locally, nationally and internationally for over 20 years. For his work to promote cultural competence and challenge the legacy of racial disparities in mental health he was honored by the U.S. Senate and the National Resource Center on Hispanic Mental Health in 2009. Mr. Vega has taught and trained on mental health advocacy, consumer empowerment, recovery programs, suicide prevention and policy at conferences across the United States and in Tokyo, Kobe, China and Canada. He holds an M.A. in Psychology from New School for Social Research and serves on the SAMHSA Recovery-to-Practice Initiative, Social Justice Advisory Committee of the California Mental Health Directors Association. He is President and co-founder of the California Association of Mental Health Peer-Run Organizations (CAMPHRO).

Edgar K. Wiggins, M.H.S.

Edgar Wiggins is the founding Executive Director of Baltimore Crisis Response, Inc. In this capacity, for over the last 23 years he functions as the Chief Executive Officer and oversees the operations of BCRI, a community-based behavioral health crisis intervention organization. He has been involved in several mental health organizations for over the last forty years. He has served as the Executive Director of the Black Mental Health Alliance, Director of Psychiatric Clinics at the Charles Drew Community Mental Health Center, and Day Hospital Director at COMHAR, Inc.

He has also served as a consultant and trainer to a variety of public and private organizations including Yale Department of Psychiatry Mobile Crisis Team, Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Psychiatry and the DC Bureau of Mental Health. He was selected to travel to Cuba as part of a delegation of health professionals and city governmental officials. Mr. Wiggins has provided training to police, paramedics, and 911 operators regarding the management of mental health emergencies. He is a past Executive Board member of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry. Currently he serves on the Boards of the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry and the National Family Resiliency Center.

Mr. Wiggins is the recipient of many awards, including awards from the Mental Health Association, the Anti Stigma Project, the National Association of Health Services Executives, and the Governor’s Citation for Suicide Prevention. The program, Mental Health Matters, won the Cameo Award for excellence in public access television programming in 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002. In 2005 he received the Mental Health Professional of the Year Award from National Alliance of The Mentally Ill. In 2006 Mr. Wiggins received the Outstanding Merit Award from the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, in 2007 he received the Heroes Award from NAMI and in 2008 he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Mental Health Association. Mr. Wiggins received the Excellence in Community Mental Health Services Award from NAMI 2010. In 2011 Mr. Wiggins received the Governor’s Citation for Inspiring Leadership and Service, he received the Mayor’s Certificate of Recognition and he also received the NAMI Maryland Certificate for Service and Leadership. In 2012 Mr. Wiggins received a Certificate of Special Recognition from the Baltimore City Police Department for police training. In 2013 Mr. Wiggins received the Visionary Award from the Anti-Stigma Project of On Our Own of Maryland, Inc. and the Honorable Judge Robert M. Bell Excellence in Community Service Award from the Sojourner-Douglass College. In 2015 he received the Marcia G. Pines Lifetime Advocacy and Service Award from NAMI.

Leslie S. Zun, M.D., M.B.A.

Dr. Leslie S. Zun is the System Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine in the Sinai Health System in Chicago, Illinois and Chairman & Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine and a secondary appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science/Chicago Medical School in North Chicago, Illinois. His background includes a medical degree (M.D.) from Rush Medical College and a business degree (M.B.A.) from Northwestern University’s JL Kellogg School of Management. He is board certified in Emergency Medicine by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Zun was a chief operating officer and acting chief executive officer for a 200 bed hospital in Chicago. Dr. Zun’s research interests include healthcare administration, violence prevention and behavioral emergencies. His publications have addressed the administration of the hospitals and emergency departments, physicians’ bonus and incentive plans and quality improvement topics. He has presented his research and lectured on these topics both nationally and internationally. He is a board member of American Academy of Emergency Medicine and the President Elect for the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry. He is the chief editor of the Behavioral Emergencies for Emergency Physicians textbook and course director for the past six years for the National Update on Behavioral Emergencies conference.

Standards, Training and Practices

Standards, Training and Practices

The role of the Standards, Training and Practices Committee is to identify and recommend essential, minimum standards for network member centers. This committee focuses on identifying appropriate evidence based trainings and program evaluation to support the maintenance of all recommended standards. This committee submits all recommendations to both Lifeline leadership and the Lifeline Steering Committee.

Bart Andrews, Ph.D. (Co-Chair)

Bart Andrews, PhD, is Vice President of Clinical Practice/Evaluation at Behavioral Health Response. He started at BHR as a crisis intervention clinician in 1998. Dr. Andrews has dedicated the last 18 years of this life to suicide and crisis intervention. Dr. Andrews is a person in recovery and a suicide attempt survivor. He believes that the path to suicide prevention must be framed in the context of relationships, community and culture. Suicide is a community health problem, and everyone can help. Dr. Andrews was recently recognized as one of the top 21 mental health professionals to follow on Twitter.

He has over 20 years of experience providing behavioral health services. Bart received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University. He is actively involved in raising community awareness about the risk of suicide and training community members, law enforcement and other professionals in suicide assessment and intervention. He participates on several crisis and suicide related boards: serves as President of the National Association of Crisis Director and Co-Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Standards, Training and Practices Sub-Committee. Dr. Andrews is also an Applied Suicide Intervention Skills (ASIST) Senior Training Coach. Through BHR, He created the first suicide follow-up program in the State of Missouri, and BHR has expanded suicide follow-up care to youth and adults throughout the eastern region of Missouri.

David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP (Co-Chair)

David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of Clinical Training at The Catholic University of America; he is an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.  He has published five books and numerous peer-reviewed journal articles.  Dr. Jobes is a past President of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) and he is the recipient of various awards for his scientific  work including the 1995 AAS “Shneidman Award” (early career contribution to suicidology), the 2012 AAS “Dublin Award” (for career contributions in suicidology), and the 2016 AAS “Linehan Award” (for suicide treatment research).  He has been a consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the FBI, the Department of Defense, and Veterans Affairs.   Dr. Jobes is member of the Scientific Council and the Public Policy Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).  He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and is Board certified in clinical psychology (American Board of Professional Psychology).  Dr. Jobes maintains a private clinical and forensic practice at the Washington Psychological Center.

Michael H. Allen, M.D.

Michael H. Allen, M.D. trained at the Institute of Living and then joined the faculty of Cornell and later, New York University School of Medicine. While at NYU, he developed the model Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program at Bellevue Hospital. He is now a Professor of Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine at the University Of Colorado School Of Medicine and is an attending at the Colorado Depression Center, consultant at the University of Colorado Hospital and medical director of the new Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners.

Dr. Allen was a principal investigator in the NIMH Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder, received a NARSAD Independent Investigator award for the study of nicotine and agitation and was a principal investigator in the testing of inhaled loxapine for agitation. He was a member the NIH Emergency Medicine Roundtable. Michael was co-investigator on the NIH Emergency Department Safety Assessment and Follow-up Evaluation study (ED SAFE) and is currently part of PRISM, a MOMRP study of suicide screening in military primary care settings. He is a leader of the team responsible for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Emergency Department Decision Support Guide. Michael chaired the American Psychiatric Association’s Task Force on Psychiatric Emergency Services, served as a member of an ACEP Clinical Policy Subcommittee, contributed to numerous national and international guidelines and served as a consultant to the US Justice Department Civil Rights Division. He is the author or editor of three books, former editor of Emergency Psychiatry, a reviewer for the Cochrane Collaborative and is currently associate editor of General Hospital Psychiatry. Dr. Allen has over 80 peer reviewed publications with citation data and his work has been cited over 2,000 times.

Jennifer J. Armstrong, LPC-MHSP

Jennifer has over 17 years of experience working in community mental health and crisis services. She currently serves as the Director of Crisis Care Services forCenterstone, one of the nation’s largest community-based mental health providers. Centerstone’s Crisis Care Services, based out of Nashville, TN., is the primary crisis provider for 20 counties in Middle Tennessee. Crisis Care Services also serves as crisis service provider for 8 additional local and national entities. Jennifer is a member of the American Association of Suicidology and the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Association of Crisis Organization Directors. Jennifer is an active member of the Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network, and serves as Clinical Coordinator for Tennessee’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Garrett Lee Smith and NSSP suicide prevention grants. She holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Tennessee.

Margaret Balfour, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Margaret (Margie) Balfour is the VP for Clinical Innovation & Quality at Connections AZ, one of the largest providers of psychiatric emergency care in Arizona. She is responsible for managing clinical operations at the Crisis Response Center on the Banner-University Medical Center South Campus in Tucson, AZ, where she led major process improvements resulting in significant decreases door-to-doctor time, injuries and other key performance indicators. Prior to joining ConnAZ, Dr. Balfour led major improvements within the public-safety net health system for Dallas, TX, with a special emphasis on emergency psychiatric services and development of integrated care models to address the behavioral health needs of patients throughout the health system. She also worked with ValueOptions to create a new program for the highest utilizers of behavioral health services in north Texas. Dr. Balfour received her M.D. and Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of Cincinnati and completed residency and a fellowship in Public and Community Psychiatry at the University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She serves on the board of directors for the American Association of Community Psychiatrists and The American Association for Emergency Psychiatry and is active in the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Balfour was the 2010 recipient of the NAMI Dallas Professional of the Year. As an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Arizona, she remains engaged in teaching and research.

David W. Bond, LCSW, B.C.E.T.S.

David W. Bond is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress.  He is the Vice President of Programs at The Trevor Project, the leading national organization providing suicide prevention and crisis intervention services to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning youth. Here David is tasked with overseeing Trevor’s suite of crisis services which includes a 24 hour Lifeline, Digital Crisis Chat and Crisis Text programs. He also oversees Trevor’s Education Department, Peer Support Programs, and Research Initiatives.  David has more than 12 years of experience as a psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of young survivors of trauma.  He has a passion for facilitating understanding and has presented widely on topics related to the treatment and effects of trauma, abuse and neglect of children and adolescents.  Before joining The Trevor Project in 2013, he served as the Manager of Youth Development Programs at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego, where he oversaw multiple psychosocial development programs for underserved youth in community, school, hospital and juvenile detention settings.  Prior to that, he was a clinical supervisor and provided bilingual mental health services at the Chadwick Center for Children and Families in San Diego, California.

Craig J. Bryan, Psy.D., ABPP

Craig Bryan has both a Master of Science and a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology from Baylor University. He has a Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics from Pennsylvania State University, and is a Diplomate at the American Board of Professional Psychology, Board Certified in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. He is Executive Director of the National Center for Veterans Studies and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at The University of Utah. His work has been published in numerous journals, including the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Rena Fitzgerald, MIT

Rena Fitzgerald is the Sr. Program Manager for Care Crisis Chat and the Learning and Development Consultant for the Behavioral Health Programs at Volunteers of America Western Washington. She has over 15 years’ experience in crisis intervention and suicide prevention and is identified by Washington State as a Mental Health Professional. She is active in community education regarding mental health issues and works closely with public schools to reduce youth suicide by providing suicide awareness instruction to students, staff, and parents. Rena has been an active participant in the Community Health Improvement Plan group for the Snohomish Health District and is a current member of the subcommittee tasked with increasing routine depression screenings for all primary care visits within Snohomish County. She has worked closely with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline over the past two years to establish Best Practices for online suicide prevention and improve methods for Quality Improvement and Quality Assurance for hotline work, including presentations at the American Association of Suicidology Conferences the past 2 years. Rena is chairing the first AFSP Out of the Darkness Community Walk in Snohomish County and also serves on the Advisory Board for Human Services at Edmonds Community College.

Madelyn Gould, PhD, MPH

Madelyn Gould, PhD, MPH, is a Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry at theColumbia University Medical Center, and a Research Scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. During the past three decades, she has obtained extensive experience in the area of suicide prevention, conducting numerous federally funded grants from the National Institute of Health (NIMH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and publishing several seminal articles on youth suicide risk and preventive interventions.  Her current SAMHSA-funded projects focus on the evaluation of telephone crisis follow-up services, continuity of care enhancements in EDs, chat crisis services, and telephone crisis interventions with callers at imminent suicide risk.  She is also studying youth suicide screening programs, and suicide risks related to bullying, contagion and modeling, and the effect of a peer’s suicide on fellow students.

Dr. Gould has a strong commitment to applying her research to program and policy development. She has participated in a number of U.S. government commissions on suicide prevention and has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Shneidman Award for Research from the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) in 1991, the New York State Office of Mental Health Research (NYSOMH) Award in 2002, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) Research Award in 2006, the New York State Suicide Prevention Center’s Excellence in Suicide Prevention Award in 2011, and the 2013 Dublin Award from the American Association of Suicidology (AAS), which is a lifetime achievement award for outstanding contributions to the field of suicide prevention.

Kris Hallstrom

Kris Hallstrom is Manager of the Boys Town National Hotline and has worked for the Boys Town organization both directly with children and families and in various administrative roles. Kris has many years of experience in training direct care staff, educators, and Hotline counselors in Suicide Prevention especially as it relates to teens. Kris has been with the Boys Town National Hotline for over 20 years and has helped to launch the Hotline’s various web-based activities to reach out to teens and young adults. She participated in the development of, and currently manages the teen website Your Life Your Voice, and coordinates BTNHL’s social media presence. Kris earned her Bachelor’s Degree from University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and her Masters in Human Development and the Family from Kansas University.

Anitha Iyer, Ph.D.

Anitha Iyer is a NYS licensed Clinical Psychologist, and Clinical Director of the crisis contact center at the Mental Health Association of NYC. Dr. Iyer graduated with a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Columbia University’s Teachers College. At MHA-NYC, Dr. Iyer provides oversight to clinical practices and training, and ensures ongoing quality improvement and adherence to best practices for all hotlines operated under Here to Help (H2H) Connect. Dr. Iyer completed a postdoctoral fellowship in treating Military Sexual Trauma at the Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in Long Beach, CA, and thereafter provided outpatient treatment to veterans at Northport VA Medical Center. She has an extensive background in treating victims of trauma, PTSD, and comorbid conditions related to traumatic experiences, particularly in the veteran population, as well as in culturally sensitive treatment, and collaborative, integrative, patient-centered care. Her professional affiliations include American Psychological Association (APA), New York State Psychological Association (NYSPA), and the South Asian Council for Social Services (SACSS) for whom she serves on the Advisory Board. Dr. Iyer is multilingual and fluent in English, Tamil, and Hindi/ Urdu. In addition to her work at MHA-NYC, Dr. Iyer maintains a small private practice in New York City.

Linda Langford, Sc.D.

Dr. Langford has been an Evaluation and Communications Scientist at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center since 2006, providing training, resources, webinars, and consultation on an array of prevention issues including communications, strategic planning, evaluation, and translating research into practice. She has worked on various efforts designed to promote effective prevention planning, to facilitate the use of strategies that are informed by the best available science and to encourage the field to evaluate their efforts, She has also worked on several communications efforts, including supporting the development of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Framework for Successful Messaging, which aims to change the national narratives about suicide prevention to focus on hope, help, and resiliency, and serving as a subject matter expert on Make the Connection, the VA’s national antistigma campaign.

Brian Mishara, Ph. D.

Dr. Mishara is a professor of psychology and Director of the Centre for Research and Intervention on Suicide and Euthanasia (CRISE) at the University of Quebec at Montreal. He has published six books in English and five in French in the areas of suicidology and gerontology, include research on the effectiveness of suicide prevention programs, studies of how children develop an understanding of suicide, theories of the development of suicidality, ethical issues in research, euthanasia and “assisted suicide,” and evaluations of helpline effectiveness. Besides his university activities, Dr. Mishara was a founder of Suicide Action Montreal, the Montreal regional suicide prevention center and the Quebec Association of Suicidology. He is the past president of the International Association for Suicide Prevention and a past President of the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention. He was the recipient of the 1994 to 1995 Bora Laskin Canadian National Fellowship on Human Rights Research for his work on human rights issues regarding the involvement of physicians and family members in assisted suicide and euthanasia. He is currently the Vice-Chair of the Trustees of Befrienders Worldwide, the association for Samaritan and similar helplines and suicide prevention services in 40 countries. He frequently conducts training and consults on evaluations for telephone and crisis services in suicide prevention around the world.

Kimberley Mullen, Ph.D.

Dr. Mullen is a licensed clinical psychologist and the Clinical Care Coordinator for theNational Veterans Crisis Line (VCL), a key component of the Department of Veterans Affairs suicide prevention program. At the VCL, she oversees the clinical training and supervision of more than 250 crisis line Responders who man the organization’s phone, text and online chat services. Dr. Mullen became interested in trauma and suicidal behavior among Veterans while completing her pre-doctoral internship at the Denver VA Medical Center. She speaks at national meetings and has been interviewed in the press on topics of suicide prevention and crisis intervention with Veterans. Dr. Mullen completed her bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies at Cornell University and received her doctoral training at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Keri Neblett, MSW

Keri Neblett has worked at the Crisis Center of Johnson County in Iowa City, IA for the last 12 years. As the Director of Crisis Intervention Services, she is responsible for the overall management of the Crisis Intervention Program, Suicide Prevention and Outreach Program, Suicide Survivor Support Services and Disaster Recovery Services. She is a member of the Iowa Disaster Behavioral Health Team and serves on the Iowa Suicide Prevention Planning Council. Keri is a certified QPR and ASIST trainer, and a site evaluator for Contact USA Accreditation. She is a board member for the Iowa Chapter of AFSP and is the chairperson of the Johnson County Suicide Prevention Coalition. Keri holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Iowa.

 

Michael Reading, MS, NCC, LMHC

Michael earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Memphis in 1996 in Community Agency Counseling. He is a National Certified Counselor and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Washington State. Having worked in the King County Public Mental Health System for 20 years serving individuals living with severe and persistent mental illness, Michael is currently the Director of Crisis Services at Crisis Clinic in Seattle, WA. He oversees the Crisis Services Department which provides various services: 24/7 Crisis Line to provide emergency telephone support for King County residents; participation with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline; 24/7 WA State Recovery Help Line to connect WA State residents to local treatment resources for Substance Abuse, Problem Gambling and Mental Health; WA Warm Line; Teen Link peer to peer support line; Teen on-line chat program; and support for Survivors of Suicide. Michael is well versed in crisis intervention, suicide prevention and is a certified ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills) Master Trainer. Michael is currently the Chair of the CONTACT USA Board of Directors and a representative to the Worldwide Alliance of Crisis Helplines (WACH) on behalf of Lifeline International.

Wendy Martinez Schneider, MS, LPC

Wendy serves as CEO for Behavioral Health Link (BHL). Located in Atlanta, GA, BHL has operated the Georgia Crisis & Access Line on behalf of the State of Georgia since 2006 and currently operates Mobile Crisis Teams in 40 Georgia Counties covering roughly half of Georgia’s population from rural coastal areas to the streets of downtown Atlanta. She has held several leadership roles with BHL since 2005 including Mobile Crisis Director, Director of Community Services, and Chief Clinical Officer. A Licensed as a Professional Counselor with a Master of Science degree in Clinical Psychology from Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI, Wendy has over eighteen years of behavioral health experience in direct service and administration in both the public and private sectors. A compassionate leader with strong interpersonal, supervisory, and clinical skills, she is dedicated to responsible stewardship of public funds and easy access for individuals to high quality behavioral health care as quickly and as close to home as possible 24/7/365.

Lisa Turbeville

Lisa Turbeville currently serves as the Program Manager for the Resource and Crisis Helpline and Legal Services for Common Ground, a crisis center located in southeastern Michigan. She started with Common Ground in 2000 and oversees the 24 hour crisis hotline, chat and text services. Lisa is originally from Chicago, IL and earned a B.A. in Social Work from Southern Illinois University. She has 27 years of experience working in crisis intervention and mental health, beginning as a volunteer on a teen crisis line. Lisa is an approved instructor for Critical Incident Stress Management through the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation and serves on the Board of Directors for the Oakland County Crisis Response Organization and Contact USA.

Kathryn VanBoskirk, MSW

Kathryn VanBoskirk MSW is a licensed clinical social worker with over 30 years of experience as a leader, therapist, advocate, and educator including extensive work in Community Mental Health centers, suicide prevention, EAP programs, schools, and hospice. She is currently Vice President of Associate Care for LivingWorks Education, a premier training company for suicide intervention and prevention. She provides strategic planning, consultation and support to all LW associates in building suicide-safer communities. Kathryn was instrumental in setting up a national network of suicide prevention trainers in Australia, Norway, Scotland and Ireland. Kathryn was chosen to consult with the California State Mental Health Services Authority to collaborate on the design of their statewide request for funding proposals for suicide prevention initiatives and review submissions. She has taught at the University Of Pennsylvania Graduate School Of Social Work in a program targeted on ethnic sensitive social work practice and specialized in providing training in culturally competent practice. Her extensive clinical work in urban and rural settings with disenfranchised and minority clients has formed the foundation for her depth of knowledge and skill in providing training. She is a minister and Rosen Method Bodyworker with a healing practice in her hometown of Sedona, Arizona. She is a member of the Arizona Suicide Prevention Coalition and a consultant with Native Americans for Community Action in Flagstaff, Arizona. She has provided training on reservations for tribal Nations in Arizona. She has been a member of the Standards, Training, and Practices Subcommittee of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline since its inception, and a longtime member of the American Association of Suicidology.

Ron White, LICSW

Ron White is the Chief Program Officer of Samaritans, Inc. with operational responsibilities for the Helpline Services (phone and text), Grief Support Services, and Community Education. Ron is responsible for the more than 500 people who volunteer at Samaritans in a direct service capacity. He received his Bachelor of Social Welfare and Master of Social Work degrees from The Ohio State University and is currently a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW) in Massachusetts. Ron has spent much of his professional career managing service centers both in the US and abroad. He joined Samaritans as Director of Programs and Services in 2007 and was promoted to his current position in 2009. Ron has also served as a member of the Massachusetts Gay, Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender Youth Commission under appointment from the Massachusetts Suicide Prevention Coalition. He is also a member of the Massachusetts Coalition for Suicide Prevention Executive Committee and Co-Chair of the Greater Boston Regional Coalition for Suicide Prevention. He currently serves on the board of the National Association of Crisis Organization Directors (NASCOD).

Ursula Whiteside, Ph.D.

Ursula Whiteside, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist with over 15 years working in the field of treatment for suicidal individuals. She is CEO of NowMattersNow.organd clinical faculty at the University Of Washington Department Of Psychiatry. She is the co-principal investigator on grants from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Whiteside is a member of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Zero Suicide Advisory Group which is focused on dramatically improving the way healthcare systems respond to suicidal individuals. Additionally she a member of the Expert Advisory for Project 2025 directed by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Standards, Trainings and Practices Subcommittee, and the Facebook team working to improve the experiences of suicidal individuals on Facebook. She is an advocate for the consumer voice in suicide prevention and has developed an online resource based on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy.

Consumer Survivor

Consumer Survivor

The Consumer Survivor Committee reviews standard network practices, marketing materials/promotional campaigns, evaluations of network coverage, and caller demographics to ensure that the Lifeline is effectively reaching critical and diverse populations at higher risk for suicide. This committee submits their recommendations to both Lifeline leadership and the Lifeline Steering Committee.

DeQuincy Lezine, Ph.D. (Co-Chair)

Dr. Lezine attempted suicide during college, but turned his personal despair into advocacy by forming the first student-led college mental health and suicide prevention group (Brown University chapter of the Suicide Prevention Action Network; B-SPAN). Since 1996, Dr. Lezine has worked with many organizations to promote suicide prevention including Suicide Prevention Action Network (SPAN) USA; National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI); the Organization of Attempters and Survivors in Interfaith Services (OASSIS); La Frontera / EMPACT Suicide Prevention Center; National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance; Suicide Attempt Survivor Task Force and Impact Group); Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC); Oklahoma Suicide Prevention Council; the Center for Dignity, Recovery, and Empowerment; and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. He was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2015 Voice Awards by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

After graduating from UCLA with a Ph.D. in clinical psychology Dr. Lezine completed a postdoctoral research fellowship with an emphasis on public health approaches to suicide prevention at the University of Rochester Center for the Prevention and Study of Suicide. He is the Chair of the Attempt Survivor and Lived Experience Division of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) as well as an internationally recognized scholar, advocate, and public speaker. As a professional writer, he is the author of “Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide,” released in 2008 by Oxford University Press and primary writer of “The Way Forward: Pathways to hope, recovery, and wellness with insights from lived experience” released in 2014 by the Action Alliance (Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force). Dr. Lezine is President and CEO of Prevention Communities, an applied research organization with a focus on suicide prevention and mental health promotion.

Sally Spencer-Thomas, Psy.D., MNM (Co-Chair)

As a clinical psychologist, mental health advocate, faculty member, and survivor of her brother’s suicide, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas sees the issues of suicide prevention from many perspectives. Currently, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is the CEO and Co-Founder of the Carson J Spencer Foundation, an award-winning organization dedicated to sustaining a passion for living through suicide prevention, social enterprise and support for people bereaved by suicide. Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is also the past Director of the Survivor of Suicide Loss Division with the American Association of Suicidology, and is the Co-Lead of the Workplace Task Force with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.

Within her role as CEO of the Carson J Spencer Foundation, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has established and founded Working Minds, the nation’s first comprehensive suicide prevention program exclusively dedicated to suicide prevention in the workplace; founded the FIRE Within program for youth and social entrepreneurs; and, was the principal partner on the award-winning Man Therapy social marketing campaign.

Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has received wide recognition for her work and has been an invited guest to the White House Briefing on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention in DC and to the World Health Organization’s World Suicide Report Launch in Geneva.  As a professional speaker, Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas was the first national speaker to frame suicide prevention as a social justice issue and has presented at dozens of college campuses and regional/national conferences empowering students to join the suicide prevention and mental health promotion movements.

Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas is also a published author and co-author of several books and articles addressing suicide prevention and postvention in the workplace, college suicide prevention, spirituality and mental health, men’s mental health, and suicide and first responders. Dr. Sally Spencer-Thomas has delivered countless conference workshops, webinars and major seminars on these topics and has been invited to make plenary addresses internationally in the United States, Canada, Ireland, Estonia, Australia, Norway, Uruguay, China and Italy.

Sean Bennett

Sean Bennett serves as Public Health Advisor to the Director of the Division of Behavioral Health, U.S. Indian Health Service, Headquarters (DBH). Sean comes to DBH as a United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Officer trained in clinical social work.  As both a uniformed service member and a civilian, Sean has worked extensively in the areas of substance use, domestic violence, suicide prevention, resiliency, and the treatment of trauma. His experience includes clinical treatment, community organizing, and program management.  As a Lieutenant Commander in the USPHS, his decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal and the National Defense Service Medal.  Sean has a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from University of Maryland and a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work from Bowie State University (Maryland). He is also the proud father of rising 5th grader, Nicholas, and is supported by loving spouse, Reselita.

Heidi Bryan

Heidi Bryan has battled with depression most of her life, is a suicide attempt survivor and lost her brother to suicide in 1995. In 1999 she founded Feeling Blue Suicide Prevention Council, now thePennsylvania Adult/Older Adult Suicide Prevention Coalition. She has served on the Board of Directors for the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention and as the Vice-Chairman of the Board of Directors for SPAN USA. Heidi was also the recipient of the SPAN USA’s Sandy Martin Grassroots Award in 2005. She developed the booklet, After an Attempt: The Emotional Impact of a Suicide Attempt on Families, which was distributed to every hospital in Pennsylvania and co-authored Now What Do I Do, a guide for suicide attempt survivors. She currently serves on the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Suicide Attempt Survivor Task Force. A QPR Master Trainer, Ms. Bryan is also a facilitator for suicide bereavement support groups and is the author of Must Be the Witches in the Mountains, a book on grief after suicide. Heidi received her BA in Chemistry from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, PA.

Stan Collins

Stan Collins has worked in the suicide prevention field for over 15 years since losing a close friend to suicide while in high school. He has presented or provided training to over 500,000 adults and youth on the subject of suicide prevention including medical professionals, military, law enforcement, school staff and community members. In 2001, he testified before a United States Senate Subcommittee on the topic of youth suicide. Currently he is working as a consultant in the field, focusing on technical assistance in creation and implementation of suicide prevention curriculums and strategies. One of Stan’s primary focuses is working on school based suicide prevention efforts. Currently, Stan serves as a suicide prevention specialist to California’s Know the Signs suicide prevention campaign. Additionally, he is serving as the coordinator the Directing Change Student Film Program which invites high school student from around California to create 60-second films about suicide prevention and mental health. Stan is a former Lifeguard and Emergency Medical Technician with the City of San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. Stan is co-author of the Know the Signs Training Resource Guide for Suicide Prevention in Primary Care toolkit, and author of the San Diego County Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for First Responders.

Franklin Cook, MA, CPC

Franklin Cook, MA, CPC, is owner of Unified Community Solutions, a private consultancy in Boston, Mass., specializing in community-based suicide prevention and postvention training and project development, management, and leadership. He is one of the original members of the CSS (since 2005) — and the knowledge and experience he brings to the Lifeline emanate from his roles as a person who is in long-term recovery from addiction, who lives with major depressive disorder, and who is a survivor of suicide loss (father died in 1978). He is an expert in peer support (including as a support group facilitator trainer for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and a life coach for Personal Grief Coaching); a project manager (implemented two Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act statewide grants in South Dakota and now manages the MassMen Project in Massachusetts); and an organizational leader and systems change agent at all levels — community, state, and national (including as Co-Lead of the Survivors of Suicide Loss Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention and as a board member for the Alliance of Hope for Suicide Loss Survivors). He also is a U.S. Army veteran (1972-1975) and serves military and veteran families as a consultant with the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS). Franklin publishes the blog Grief After Suicide; and he maintains the online clearinghouse After a Suicide Resource Directory, a resource that was originally developed through a CSS work group.

Ashby Dodge, LCSW

Ashby Dodge is the Clinical Director at The Trevor Project  – the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people under the age of 25.  Ms. Dodge oversees all of Trevor’s Crisis Services, including the 24/7 Trevor Lifeline, TrevorChat and TrevorText; trainings and clinical supervision. Ashby assumes responsibility for a broad range of programs and projects, including professional communications, development of the crisis services department, and oversight of selected staff, clinicians and social work interns within Crisis Services. Ms. Dodge also runs a small private practice in New York City, focusing additionally on sexual assault, substance abuse treatment and couples/individual counseling.  Prior to her work at The Trevor Project, she worked in various mental health settings, focusing on young professionals, couples and LGBTQ youth – with specialties in substance abuse treatment, sexual assault/domestic violence survivors, and at-risk, inner city high school students.

Darlene ‘Dar’ Emme

Ms. Emme is Founder and Deputy Director of Yellow Ribbon International Suicide Prevention Program®. She is the survivor of her son, Mike’s, death by suicide in 1994. She led the development of the Yellow Ribbon Training programs that are being used by chapters and program sites internationally. Working and traveling full time with the program, she is the co-founder of the Yellow Ribbon International Youth Council and has addressed and taught more than 300,000 youth that it is “OK to Ask for Help!®” She was appointed to the Colorado Governor’s Suicide Prevention Advisory Commission in 1998, helping to develop the Colorado State Suicide Prevention Plan and create the Colorado Office of Suicide Prevention and the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Colorado. She also is a founding member of the National Council for Suicide Prevention. Ms. Emme works to forge collaborations with organizations and has partnered with the American Osteopathic Association, the B’nai B’rith Youth Organization (BBYO) and many others. She served as a national judge for the Alliance of the American Psychiatric Association’s “When Not to Keep a Secret” national essay contest. She is co-author of “I’ll Always Be with You” in Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul and “Legacy of the Yellow Mustang.”

Ms. Emme worked to establish an International Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week in 1995, observed annually in September, which has been recognized by the U.S. Senate, U.S. House and State Governors. The week is now blended with Suicide Prevention Groups across the U.S. and is observed the 2nd week of September and with World Suicide Prevention Day on September 10th. She has also been individually recognized twice for her work by the U.S. House of Representatives. As a survivor of her own attempts, she has worked to empower and save youth her entire life through volunteerism, mentoring and training. Her work has included helping numerous communities across the country using her extensive background in Search and Rescue coordination and training to empower and mobilize local and regional resources.

April Foreman, Ph.D.

April C. Foreman, Ph.D. is a Licensed Psychologist serving Veterans as Suicide Prevention Coordinator for Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System. She also serves as Suicide Prevention Lead for Veterans Integrated Service Network 16, a region of Veterans Affairs. She is passionate about helping people with severe (sometimes lethal) emotional pain, and in particular advocates for people with Borderline Personality Disorder, which has one of the highest mortality rates of all mental illnesses. She is known for her work at the intersection of technology, social media, and mental health, with nationally recognized implementations of innovations in the use of technology and mood tracking. She is also a founder and moderator of the first sponsored regular mental health chat on Twitter, the weekly Suicide Prevention Social Media chat (#SPSM, sponsored by the American Association of Suicidology, AAS) , and is recipient of the AAS’s Roger J. Tierney Award for this work. In the last year this chat has become one of the largest and most active mental health centered social media communities on Twitter. She is currently the Social Media Chair for AAS. Her dream is to use her unique skills and vision to build a mental health system effectively and elegantly designed to serve the people who need it.

Barbara Franks

Barbara is the former Program Associate for the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium(ANTHC) for their Meth Suicide Prevention Intervention (MSPI Grant) for 6-1/2 years. She changed career paths from the administrative field to suicide prevention after her youngest son joined the category of Alaska Native male, age, 23, using a firearm on December 14, 1997. After being told by a counselor six months after her son’s death she should “get over it,” Barb was compelled to share her information that she researched on how to move forward with others. At the age of 52 she lived her dream to enter college and graduated from the University of Alaska/Anchorage with her Associates Degree where she was chosen to participate in the First Alaskans Institute Internship Program that led her to ANTHC and their suicide prevention program. After requesting the blessing of the Elders, she made numerous trips across Alaska with suicide prevention awareness messages and sharing the LivingWorks intervention tools as a Master Trainer in both safeTALK and ASIST. After accomplishing that, Barb has moved into the third process of suicide by providing people with a safe place to share their stories by incorporating SurvivorVoices to the 12 Tribal Health Organizations under ANTHC.

She is an advocate under the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention as an Ambassador in their newly created program to provide recommendations to Alaska’s Legislative Delegation in Washington, D.C. Her involvement in suicide prevention provides recommendations to the University of Alaska Suicide Prevention Advisory Board and a new member of the American Association of Suicidology. Barbara serves on the Governor’s Statewide Suicide Prevention Council voted in her third term as Vice Chair; she has recently been appointed to the NAMI/Anchorage Board and also serves on the Alaska Psychiatric Institute Advisory Council. Her wrap-around advocacy helps Alaska focus to help young people realize there is hope. With the statewide media campaign that received many awards and also promotes the Alaska Careline Crisis Intervention number and the message, “You are not alone.” It has been her policy to shed light on the many things that are happening with suicide prevention and as a result people are now moving to bring awareness through the offerings the program can provide. Through all these programs, it is a dream becoming a reality that federal, state and private entities work together to help with the National Strategy on Suicide Prevention goals and guidelines for a safer community.

Barb Gay

Barb Gay is the Executive Director of the Area Substance Abuse Council, Inc., a comprehensive substance abuse treatment and prevention non-profit agency located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  She has been working in human services since 1993, and has been fortunate to work in her home community. Barb has been able to use her personal experiences to help guide programs that strive to improve resources and supports.  Barb has been able to offer her voice as a suicide attempt survivor to help move forward the work of suicide prevention, including serving as a member Suicide Attempt Survivor Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.  Barb has her MA degree in Health Education from the University of Northern Iowa and her undergraduate degree in psychology and sociology from St. Ambrose University and she is a Certified Prevention Specialist.

Katie Hardy

Katie Hardy is the founder and CEO of the nonprofit Six Feet Over (est. 2013), based out of the Detroit Metropolitan area, created to serve the survivors of suicide loss in her community with financial assistance for funerals, clean up and memorials after loss as well as provide outreach and resource information to her community. Six Feet Over, and its program Suck It! Suicide, are focused on helping all survivors, with a special interest in the non-mainstream communities of the music, art and youth demographics. Katie is the survivor of 8 losses by suicide beginning with the loss of her mother in 2003. She found that support groups and functions catered to the norm of society and saw the need within her community for information, conversations and postvention after loss. Katie has spoken at and participated in facilitating many events including Survivors Day conferences, schools, community events, memorials, and told her story to both public and private companies providing a better understanding and more insight into the life of a survivor. Katie Hardy has been featured in several articles and blogs including Hour Detroit, The Oakland Press, BLocal Detroit, Hip In Detroit, mentions in The Metro Times, and the commentary in the podcast A History of the Ridiculous.

Joanne L. Harpel, M.Phil., J.D.

A world-renowned expert on suicide bereavement and postvention, Joanne has a nationwide independent practice providing personalized guidance and support to individuals, families, schools, faith communities, and workplaces coping with suicide loss; educating professionals; and developing public awareness initiatives.

A former litigation attorney with one of the country’s leading law firms, and long-time survivor of her own brother’s suicide, she was recruited in 2001 by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to develop comprehensive capacity relating to the aftermath of suicide. In addition to working directly with hundreds of bereaved families and communities, her contributions include:

– International Survivors of Suicide Day, which now takes place annually in over 300 cities on six continents;
– a toolkit utilized by school communities across the country facing real-­‐time crises;
– a primer on explaining suicide to children;
– media education initiatives to promote safe and effective reporting to minimize the risk of contagion;
– innovative clinical education, public education, support group facilitator training, and outreach programs; and
– development of diverse creative media for public awareness efforts.

Joanne is a seasoned guest lecturer, trainer, media spokesperson, and public speaker, including at the United Nations, on Capitol Hill, and for the American Psychiatric Association, American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, International Association for Suicide Prevention, and Bereaved Parents of the USA. The recipient of the American Association of Suicidology’s Survivor of the Year Award and a member of the Association of Death Education and Counseling, she has collaborated with organizations ranging from the NIMH, VA, and World Health Organization, to the Columbia University Schools of Journalism and Social Work, HBO, and Sesame Street.

A cum laude graduate of Amherst College, she also holds graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the New York University School of Law. She is based in New York City.

Leah Harris, M.A.

Leah Harris, M.A., is a mother, advocate, and storyteller who has written and spoken widely about her lived experiences of trauma, addiction, serious mental health challenges, suicide, resilience, and recovery. As a suicide attempt survivor, she advocates for the meaningful inclusion of the perspectives of attempt survivors in every aspect of suicide prevention, intervention, postvention, and research. She was a member of the Suicide Attempt Survivor Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and contributed to the landmark document “The Way Forward: Pathways to Hope, Recovery, and Wellness with Insights from Lived Experience.” Ms. Harris is a faculty member with the Zero Suicide Academy, a training for senior leaders of health and behavioral health care organizations that seeks to dramatically reduce suicides among patients in their care, and is a member of the Zero Suicide Advisory Group. Leah worked with the Mental Health Association of San Francisco (MHASP) to adapt and deliver “Sound out for Life,” a training designed to help empower suicide attempt survivors to share about their experiences of suicide, behavioral health, and recovery with a variety of stakeholders.

Sue Klebold, M.A.

Sue Klebold is the mother of Dylan Klebold, one of the two gunmen at Columbine High School in 1999 who killed twelve students and a teacher, and injured numerous others before taking their own lives. In working to understand her son’s involvement in the devastating incident, she has reached out to organizations that examine brain health and support suicide prevention efforts. Sue has participated in presentations, co-chaired conferences at the state and national levels, and written about the experience of surviving a loved one’s murder-suicide. In addition to volunteering on local non-profit boards, she is a member of the National Loss and Healing Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).

Sue has a Master’s degree in Education from Cardinal Stritch University. Prior to her retirement in July 2010, she worked for the State of Colorado as an instructor and administrator in the Colorado Community College System, and as a project specialist for the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. She is the author of A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy (Crown Publishing, 2016) from which she is donating all author profits to expand brain health awareness and suicide prevention outreach.

Alison Malmon

Ms. Malmon is founder and Executive Director of Active Minds, Inc., the leading organization dedicated to utilizing the student voice to raise mental health awareness on college campuses. She started the program while a junior at the University of Pennsylvania, following the suicide of her older brother and only sibling, Brian. Wanting to combat the stigma that had caused Brian to suffer in silence and ultimately take his own life, she created a group on her campus that promoted an open, enlightened dialogue around the issues. Just two years later in 2003, Ms. Malmon formed the 501(c)(3) organization in order to develop and support chapters of the student group on campuses around the country. She has since served as President and Executive Director of the non-profit organization, setting up chapters of the student group and creating a unified national voice for young adults in the mental health awareness movement. In ten years, Active Minds has grown to more than 400 chapters on college campuses throughout North America. Each group’s goal is to promote the student voice in educating young adults about mental health and available resources for seeking help.

For her efforts Alison has been named a Top 25 Global Social Entrepreneur by American Express and Ashoka Changemakers; Washingtonian of the Year by Washingtonian Magazine; Potomac, Maryland Citizen of the Year, a Woman of Distinction from American Association of University Women, and received the Tipper Gore Remember the Children Award from Mental Health America. She has been profiled in the New York Times, CNN, Glamour, and Washington Post. Having graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003, Alison now lives in Washington, D.C. with her husband and two daughters.

Karen M. Marshall

Dedicated to reducing the number of suicide deaths and attempts in her community, state and nation, Karen M. Marshall has spent 25 years working in suicide awareness, prevention, intervention, and post-vention (support for people bereaved by suicide). She is a former print and broadcast journalist who utilizes her communications background to make the hopeful message of saving lives from suicide available to all who will listen.

Currently, she is the Outreach and Training Coordinator for the SAMHSA GLS-fundedSacred Bundle Youth Suicide Prevention project housed at American Indian Health and Family Services in Detroit. The organization concentrates on delivering the LivingWorks suite of awareness, prevention, and intervention trainings to the 12 federally-recognized Tribes in Michigan and to service providers for the 48,000 urban Native Americans/Alaska Natives in the Detroit metropolitan area. She is a suicideTALK, and safeTALK trainer and ASIST Master Trainer.

Karen’s involvement in the field also includes advisory work to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) as a member and former co-chair of the Consumer-Survivor Subcommittee, and the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Depression Center’s National Advisory board. She is a speaker and workshop presenter for local, state, national and international suicide prevention conferences; and assisted with establishment of state suicide prevention groups in Michigan, Virginia, Illinois, and California.

Greta Gustava Martela 

Greta Gustava Martela is the co-founder and Executive Director of Trans Lifeline. Ms. Martela has drawn on her own experience with suicidality to create a resource that is able to respond to the needs of the trans community. Prior to Trans Lifeline, Ms. Martela worked as a software engineer.

Iden D. Campbell McCollum

Iden D. Campbell McCollum was first diagnosed with depression in the third grade. He has lived with depression and suicidal thoughts for much of his life. Iden is a suicide attempt survivor and in 2011 lost his partner to suicide. He is a nationally known activist in the transgender community, speaking on suicide prevention, transgender health and wellness. The Founder and Executive Director of The Campbell Center, a peer-run agency in Washington, D.C. for individuals living with mental health and addictions challenges, Iden has worked in the nonprofit sector in Washington, D.C., Maryland and North Carolina, including positions as Project Manager of the McClendon Center Best Health Project (a D.C.-based center to improve the quality of life of individuals recovering from mental illness), Chairperson of the federally-funded D.C. PAIMI Advisory Council (promoting the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness), and Chairperson of the D.C. State Vocational Rehabilitation Commission (facilitating employment among individuals with physical or mental impairments). Iden has also served as a board member of the D.C. State Independent Living Council (promoting independent living among individuals with disabilities), University Legal Services (promoting advocacy and protection for individuals with disabilities), and Cornerstone Investments (promoting housing for individuals with mental illness). He was awarded the 2013 National LGBT Leadership Award at the Alternatives Conference in Austin, TX, was awarded the 1999 Direct Care Professional of the Year by Arc of Maryland (promoting advocacy for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities) and the 1999 Direct Care Professional of the Year Award by the Maryland Association of Community Services (supporting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families). Iden also serves in an advisory capacity to the Center of Excellence (CoE) on Behavioral Health for Racial/Ethnic Minority Young Men Who Have Sex with Men (YMSM) and Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender Populations (LGBT) and to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Samantha Nadler, LMSW

Samantha Nadler started her work in suicide prevention as a result of a long, personal history with suicide. She first started experiencing thoughts of suicide at the age of 12, to be followed by 8 attempts to end her life – the last taking place in 2008 at age 19. It was through her lived experience of thoughts and behaviors of suicide, in addition to her interactions with family, friends, and providers, that she felt the need to fight this complex issue as a career. Ms. Nadler started speaking openly about her lived experience in 2012, and has since then shared her story to various audiences, including at the American Association of Suicidology’s annual conference and for the Live Through This project.

Nadler is a licensed social worker in Nashville working for the Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network. She has been working in suicide prevention and crisis services for 7 years, starting as a crisis line volunteer. Samantha eventually transitioned to a management position within the crisis line that was also part of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. During her 5-year tenure with the crisis line in Nashville, she also facilitated a Survivors of Suicide Loss support group. In her current position with the Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network, she conducts various suicide prevention training curriculums to the public – including QPR, ASIST, AMSR, and suicide to Hope – in addition to working with local agencies as they implement the Zero Suicide Initiative. Samantha holds a Master of Science in Social Work with a concentration in trauma treatment from University of Tennessee.

Andrew O’Brien

Andrew O’Brien is the founder of WYSH Project, a nonprofit geared toward preventing military suicides and educating the public about suicide prevention. Andrew served 4 years in the U.S. Army, including 12 months in Iraq as a lead gunner.

A suicide attempt survivor, public speaker, and author of three books concerning suicide and the military, Andrew works to educate the public at colleges, military bases, and businesses concerning suicide prevention and motivational speaking.

Shelby Rowe, M.B.A.

Shelby Rowe is the manager of education and prevention programs for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Ms. Rowe has over 20 years of experience in public health, and has been a leader in the suicide prevention movement since 2007. Being a suicide attempt survivor, Ms. Rowe dedicates herself every day to fighting the prejudice and discrimination that affects those affected by suicide.

While in Arkansas, Ms. Rowe played a key role in the creation of the first Arkansas State Plan for Suicide Prevention in 2010 and cofounded the Arkansas Suicide Prevention Network, later renamed the Arkansas Suicide Prevention Initiative.  As the Executive Director for the Arkansas Crisis Center (2007-2011), Ms. Rowe expanded the statewide crisis hotline and helped make Arkansas one of the first states to offer online crisis chat services. She led the efforts of the Statewide Injury Prevention Center in Arkansas to coordinate comprehensive suicide prevention training for educators, mental health professionals, first responders and health care providers.

Ms. Rowe has served on the board of directors for the National Association of Crisis Center Directors, and was a member of the Arkansas Mental Health Planning and Advisory Council. Ms. Rowe is a proud member of the Chickasaw Nation, holds a B.A. in Sociology and Philosophy from Oklahoma State University, and a M.B.A. from the University of Phoenix.

Cheryl Sharp, MSW, ALWF

Cheryl Sharp holds the unique perspective of a person who has recovered from significant mental health challenges, a trauma survivor, a family member of a loved one who died as a result of mental illness, and a provider of substance abuse and mental health services. Sharp has worked with adult trauma survivors for over 28 years and trains and speaks nationally on trauma-informed care and suicide prevention. She is a Master WRAP Trainer, Mental Health First Aid USA instructor, and trainer of Intentional Peer Support. Sharp is also an ordained minister. She has worked as a hospice/medical social worker and as a director of social services for a skilled nursing facility. She received a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) Voice Award for her work and personal stories educating the public about behavioral health and the Lou Ann Townsend Courage Award for her contributions to persons with psychiatric disabilities. As an exclusive consultant to the National Council’s Trauma-Informed Care Learning Communities, Sharp has led many behavioral health organizations in preparing to offer trauma-informed care.  Sharp also works as General Manager for Kenyon Ranch in Tubac, Arizona and Executive Director of the STAR Foundation.

Dese’Rae L. Stage

Dese’Rae L. Stage is an artist and suicide awareness activist. She is the creator of Live Through This, a collection of portraits and stories of suicide attempt survivors, as told in their own voices. Live Through This re-imbues the topic of suicide with humanity by putting faces and names to the statistics that have been the only representation of attempt survivors in the past. As of December 2015, Dese’Rae has collected the stories and portraits of 134 attempt survivors in 20 US cities.

Dese’Rae speaks at universities, professional, and academic conferences nationwide about Live Through This, crowdfunding, and suicide prevention in social media. She has provided commentary for The Glenn Beck Program, Fox News, and BBC Radio. In January 2015, she was recognized as NY1’s New Yorker of the Week. She was also the winner of the SAMHSA Voice Award and the inaugural Paul G. Quinnett Lived Experience Writing Contest. Her writing has been published by Cosmopolitan, Huffington Post, and XoJane.

Live Through This has received extensive media coverage, including features in the New York Times, Associated Press, NPR, and more. Dese’Rae lives in Philadelphia, PA with her wife.

Adam D. Swanson, MPP

Adam D. Swanson, MPP, is an awarded public speaker, writer and advocate dedicated to equity in public health and social service systems. He helps state governments, tribes, universities and health care organizations improve the quality of care for people in crisis as the senior prevention specialist at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. Adam has served on national and international expert panels to address minority health disparities, and managed national programs to help behavioral health organization adopt innovative treatment services for youth with living with serious mental illnesses. In the U.S. Senate, he helped advance anti-bullying legislation and HIV/AIDS reforms. Adam is a former Mental Health America fellow.

William Young, D.Min.

Dr. Young has more than 33 years in ministry and more than 30 years in counseling. He is a licensed Professional Counselor and serves as Bishop of Greater Fellowship Faith Tabernacle in Bolivar, Tennessee and The Healing Center Full Gospel Baptist Church, Divisions of Greater Fellowship Ministries, Inc. Dr. Young is a Veteran, having served his country during the Vietnam War era. He was the first African American Staff Chaplain to serve at Methodist Health Systems in Memphis from June 1981 to July 1994. Before accepting that assignment he served as Staff Chaplain at Western State Mental Institute in Bolivar, Tennessee. Dr. Young is a Clinical Member of The American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy. He is licensed by the State of Tennessee in three areas: Marriage and Family Therapist; Professional Counselor; and as a Clinical Pastoral Therapist. He is a graduate of Lemoyne-Owen College. He earned his M. Div. in Pastoral Care and Counseling from Memphis Theological Seminary and did doctoral work on his D. Min at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary completing the doctorate of Ministry at Carolina Theological Seminary. He is a charter member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. The 30 years of experience in the field of counseling has allowed Dr. Young to be a pioneer in the field among African American Clinicians. He specializes in marriage and family, grief, stress and burnout. He and his wife Dianne have faithfully co-hosted a Christian talk show, “On the Road to Healing” each Sunday morning on Memphis’ 1340 WLOK AM since 1994. The talk show is one of the Mid-South’s most popular call-in broadcasts. It is also the only African-American Christian Talk Show in the Mid-South Area. The Young’s also co-hosted “Memphis On The Air, Night Talk,” a two-hour, nightly public affairs, call-in show heard by thousands around the world via radio and the internet.

Dr. Young and his wife hosted the first National Suicide and the Black Church Conference at The Healing Center in Memphis, Tennessee, in 2003. These conferences continue to grow biennially, sharpening the awareness of the increased number of African Americans now making suicide an option. Young’s counseling expertise and experience is greatly respected throughout the Mid-South Area, state and country. Dr. Young has partnered with numerous agencies, churches and community leaders in regards to making aware the needs of the African American community.

Accessibility Requirements

Section 508 requires that when Federal agencies develop, procure, maintain, or use electronic and information technology (EIT), Federal employees with disabilities have comparable access to and use of information and data as Federal employees who have no disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. Section 508 also requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from a Federal agency, have comparable access to and use of information and data as the public without disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency.

Although Federal agencies have an explicit statutory obligation to make all EIT that they develop, maintain, or use compliant with Section 508, the current emphasis is on newly procured EIT because it is the category that is explicitly enforceable by legal action. Procurement awards made on or after June 25, 2001, are subject to Section 508 (see FAR Final Rule).

According to the Access Board, the Section 508 requirements do not apply retroactively to pre-existing EIT. Specifically, the “Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards: Economic Assessment,” states that

“The standards are to be applied prospectively and do not require Federal agencies to retrofit existing electronic and information technology. As agencies upgrade and change their electronic and information technology, they must comply with the standards.” (See Chapter 2.1 Final Standards)

It should be noted, however, that other Federal regulations and guidelines (e.g., Section 501 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act) require equal access for individuals with disabilities. Therefore, Federal agencies are required, upon request, to provide information and data to individuals with disabilities through an alternative means of access that can be used by the individuals.

Privacy Policy

We use web measurement and customization technologies, such as cookies, to help our website function better for visitors and to better understand how the public is using our website.

We use session cookies to gather data for technical purposes, such as enabling better navigation through our website and generating aggregated statistics about how the website is used.

Session cookies are temporary text files that expire when you leave our website. When cookies expire, they are automatically deleted from your computer. We do not use session cookies to collect PII, and we do not share data collected from session cookies.

Our use of session cookies is defined as “Tier 1” usage in accordance with the OMB Memorandum (M)-10-22 Guidance for Online Use of Web Measurement and Customization Technologies.

We use multi-session cookies, a.k.a. persistent cookies, to customize our website for frequent visitors and to test variations of website design and content. Multi-session cookies are cookies that are stored over more than a single session on your computer. We do not use multi-session cookies to collect PII, and we do not share data collected from multi-session cookies. Our multi-session cookies are set to expire two years after your last visit to our website. After two years, they are automatically deleted from your computer. Our use of multi-session cookies is defined as “Tier 2” usage in accordance with the OMB Memorandum (M)-10-22 Guidance for Online Use of Web Measurement and Customization Technologies.

You can take actions to block cookies. Blocking these cookies from your computer will not affect your access to the content and tools on our website. Instructions to opt out are available on USA.gov.

If you send us e-mail or send a message via our Contact Form or publications order form, your identity and the contents of your message are covered by the Privacy Act. Be assured that:

  • The information will not be shared with anyone not on the staff of SAMHSA or MHA of NYC.
  • Your e-mail address will not be provided to any third party or used for any electronic mailing lists— government or private.
  • We do not create individual profiles with the e-mail information you provide or give it to any other organizations.
  • The e-mail material, including your e-mail address and/or name will in no way be correlated or linked to the material that is automatically collected as described above. The only exceptions to item 4 above would be pursuant to a bona fide Court Order.
  • We do not collect information for commercial marketing.

The use we will make of your information is to:

  • Consider your suggestions.
  • Possibly respond directly to you for clarification.
  • Try and answer your questions if you ask them.

This site is maintained for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is protected by various provisions of Title 18, U.S. Code. Violations of Title 18 are subject to criminal prosecution in Federal court.

For site security purposes and to ensure that this service remains available to all users, we employ software programs to monitor traffic to identify unauthorized attempts to upload or change information, or otherwise cause damage. In the event of authorized law enforcement investigations and pursuant to any required legal process, information from these sources may be used to help identify an individual.

If you have any questions about the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline privacy policy, please feel free to visit our contact form.

The Information Center provides information about mental health for users of mental health services and their families, policymakers, providers, the media, and the public. Our staff members are skilled at listening and responding to questions from the public and professionals. They quickly direct callers to Federal, State, and local organizations dedicated to treating and preventing mental illness. The Information Center also has information on Federal grants, conferences, and other events.

Our Web site will sometimes link to another website that is not owned or operated by MHA-NYC. Once you link to another site, you are subject to the privacy policy of the new site. This includes the sites that you may link to through our search engine.

All text materials on this Web site are in the public domain. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline encourages copying or any other utilization of the text. Some of the graphic materials on this site are in the public domain and other graphics may be used with permission, but that permission does not necessarily extend to all. If you have any permission questions, please visit our contact form.

Image Credits & Sources

Whenever possible, we have used images and photography on the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline website that have been shared publicly with us or our partners. Additional images that have been sourced are used under the Creative Commons License.

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1-800-273-8255

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Do not use this contact form if you need crisis counseling. If you need immediate help, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) to talk with a trained counselor.

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