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Depression and suicide affect people of all ages and populations, but Native American and Alaskan Native populations can be at a higher risk. If you’re struggling, the Lifeline is available to help, 24/7.

How To Take Care Of Yourself

If you are struggling, there are ways to cope right now. You can also call the Lifeline at any time -- we're free, confidential, and 24/7.

Talk to someone: Silence isn’t strength. Don’t keep suicidal feelings to yourself. Lean on your support networkfind a therapist or a support group, or get in touch with the Lifeline.

Make a safety plan: Have a step-by-step plan ready for if/when you feel depressed, suicidal, or in crisis, so you can start at step one and continue through the steps until you feel safe.

Build your support network: Having a sense of belonging to one’s culture, or a strong tribal/spiritual bond can be helpful. Discuss problems with family or friends — feeling connected to others can create positive emotional health.

Find an activity you enjoy: Taking care of yourself is an important part of your recovery. Your “self-care” activities can be anything that makes you feel good about yourself.

How To Help

Know the facts: Complex, interrelated factors contribute to suicide among AI/AN people. Risk factors include mental health disorders, substance abuse, intergenerational trauma, and community-wide issues.

Ask and listen: Be an active part of your loved ones’ support systems and check in with them often. If a they show any warning signs for suicide, be direct. Tell them it’s OK to talk about suicidal feelings. Practice active listening techniques and let them talk without judgment.

Get them help and take care of yourself: Don’t be afraid to get your loved one the help they might need. Helping a loved one through a crisis is never easy. You might want to talk about your feelings with another friend or a counselor. The Lifeline is always here to talk or chat.

Get in touch

Call the Lifeline